Listening to Your Nightly Dreams

dreaming-sleep

Listening to the Language of Your Nightly Dreams
By Cynthia Richmond

Dreams are a universal language, people dream in every culture and they have since Adam and Eve or the first humans began populating the planet. They are a natural process; you don’t have to try to dream. Some people have intentionally squelched remembering their dreams due to trauma. Others wish they could turn off recurring dreams of disturbing images. We will address both of those issues and many others in this monthly column. Each situation is understandable of course. However, if you think of dreams as direct communication with your Source, and you have tools to help manage the emotional discomfort, you may be more inclined to remember and work with them. What we know for sure is that everyone dreams every night, in fact every mammal dreams every sleep time, you know what I am talking about if you have a dog and have ever watched him sleep—you imagine him chasing a rabbit or jumping into your arms—there is indeed a reason and value for our dream life.

I am often asked: “Why are dreams so difficult to understand? Why can’t they just show me the answer? Why do I have to figure out the meaning behind the symbols or dream actions? Why don’t my dreams just spell it out?” Many dream symbols are universal, what Carl Jung referred to as coming from the Collective Unconscious. A mountain may represent a difficult challenge if it is in your path, however if you are on top of it, you have achieved your goal. Taking it personal a mountain could be recreation, as in repelling or skiing, or simply represent a beautiful view. What comes to your mind when you think of a mountain? You may now imagine why dreams are almost always symbolic. Every image may have a different association to every dreamer. That may be why it can be startling to wake up with the exact factual answer to your question or to remember saying the words you longed to hear from someone in your dreamscape. But a small percentage of dreams are literal and require no interpretation.

Additionally a percentage of dreams are precognitive, that is they predict a truth that becomes evident. During the 1960’s there were two dream bureaus, one in London, England and one in New York, USA each registered dreams from folks who tended to have dreams that came true. In order for a dream to be deemed precognitive there had to be proof, such as a newspaper article or other factual information. A dreamer may have dreamed of a plane crash and have seen the N number, (registration) on the tail of the plane. They may have dreamt of an earthquake with damage in a specific location…or they could have dreamed of the unexpected death of a loved one. During those years it was determined that 12% of dreams do come true.

So whether your dreams are guidance for your life in the present, inspiration for your future, an opportunity to connect with your dear departed loved ones or creative inspiration to enhance your life or improve your health, I hope you will join me here each month as we explore and seek to understand the mystical, beautiful language of our nightly dreams.

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